A “Moving” Story

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Two stories about listening…

First, if you have a minute today, it is so worth listening to this StoryCorps segment. I heard it this morning as I exited the Starbucks drive-through so it created a perfect moment – one I extended by taking the long way home. Here’s the link:

http://www.npr.org/2014/05/30/317035044/once-forbidden-books-become-a-lifeline-for-a-young-migrant-worker

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As regular readers know, I’ve also been moving (driving) as I listen to Donna Tartt’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, The Goldfinch. Update: I have one CD to go. Number 26 is now in the slot and ready to push play. I am sad, rather than relieved, about this. Theo and Boris and Hobie have been my companions all winter and spring, and very soon our lives will not be as tangled. I will miss thinking about them during the day. This is how powerful The Goldfinch has been for me: I was in a store recently and considering buying something (a book perhaps?) and my first thought was, “I can’t do that. I already owe thousands of dollars to….” before realizing I had confused fiction and reality. Another night, just last week, I woke up at 2:00 in the morning with a start thinking: “Oh no, he’s trapped!’  It took time before I could settle down enough to go back to sleep. It’s been a long time since a book has inserted itself so powerfully over my non-reading hours.

I was not at all surprised to read in this morning’s New York Times that David Pittu won the 2014 Audio Publishers Association’s award for his narration of The Goldfinch – in the solo narration category.

Finally, a picture a friend sent from Waterville Valley, New Hampshire. It looks like a library where you could reasonably expect 3 cheery bears to visit while waiting for their porridge to cool!

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Have a good weekend – wherever the road leads you…

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2 thoughts on “A “Moving” Story

  1. Looking forward to hearing your review of The Goldfinch. I felt emotionally taxed as I read it, because I was consumed by the characters and the choices ( mostly bad) they made.

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